Australian macadamia industry announces a final crop of 43,600 tonnes in-shell

The Australian Macadamia Society has announced a final crop of 43,600 tonnes in-shell for 2014, an increase of 24% (8400 tonnes) on last year’s crop.

In-shell sales increased 124% to 11,200 tonnes, leaving just 32,400 tonnes in-shell processed to produce 9500 tonnes of kernel.

Kernel supplies remain tight with approximately 7% kernel stock uncommitted at the end of October compared with 9% the year prior.

Australian Macadamia Society Chief Executive Officer Jolyon Burnett attributed a mix of favourable weather conditions, good pricing and a comparatively long harvest to the higher than expected crop size.

“There was an early start to the season and a long tail, with many growers only completing harvest in late November,” said Mr. Burnett. (The macadamia harvest season normally runs from February/March to
August/September).

“As well, and because there was minimal wet weather, growers were able to continually harvest throughout the season unimpeded by rain. Good prices made it more profitable for growers to conduct an additional
‘late harvest’ pick-up, and therefore a very high percentage of the total crop has been harvested overall.”

Mr. Burnett said the dry conditions meant there was less disease in macadamia orchards this year, and therefore kernel recovery has been significantly higher.

“The ‘A’ variety macadamia trees, which are ‘late season’ varieties, also performed well this season, and these have a higher kernel recovery,” said Mr. Burnett.

“Overall, global demand remains strong and is not showing any signs of slowing down.”

The 2014 Australian macadamia crop figure is provided by the Australian Macadamia Society (AMS) based on actual factory receipts of the Australian Macadamia Handlers Association (AMHA). Members account for over 90% of all macadamia handling in Australia.

For further information contact: Lynne Ziehlke – Market Development Manager
Mob: 0488 032 248 or Tel: +61 2 6622 4933
www.australian-macadamias.org

Did you like this article?

Subscribe to the macadamia review to get more news like this delivered straight to your inbox.

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MACADAMIA REVIEW

and be the first to know about the latest news from the Australian macadamia industry.